Pinterest are introducing ‘buyable pins’ allowing users to purchase items ‘pinned’ directly from the app.

In a blog post, Pinterest acknowledge it is a feature both users and businesses have been requesting and they are finally ready to make it happen.

In a few weeks U.S Pinterest users will be able to purchase items directly from the Pinterest app. However this is only for the iPhone and iPad apps, for those using an Android device or the desktop website will have to wait for a future release. It is also not known when this is likely to roll out internationally.

Initially Pinterest will have over 2 million buyable pins. These will be from select US retailers including Macy’s, Neiman Marcus and Nordstrom.

Pinterest have also partnered with ecommerce platforms including Shopify, Madesmith and Poler Outdoor Stuff as well as enterprise platform Demandware.

Those items which will be available to buy through Pinterest will feature a price in blue.

Once a user clicks on that pin to see more, they will see the blue ‘buy’ button, alongside the icon red ‘pin it’ button.

Users will also see multiple colour options if available as well filter pins by price.

pinterest buyable pin button

Users will easily be able to purchase using Apple Pay or a credit card. Pinterest have said they working with Apple pay and payment processors to ensure the highest security by not touching any credit card details, but still making it easy for repeat purchases.

According to comScore, Pinterest has 70 million monthly active users. And new research from Millward Brown reveals 93% of active Pinners said they use Pinterest to plan for purchases and 87% said they’ve purchased something because of Pinterest.

Interestingly Facebook owned Instagram, has also announced their plans to launch a buy button, whilst Facebook announced they plan to begin testing their ‘buy’ button in July.

Retailers should start to look at or revisit their social commerce strategy. Social commerce is starting to hot up!

Sandeep Vadgama

Sandeep Vadgama

Staff


Editor of Fourth Source and freelance SEO/Digital Marketer based in London.